Mary Seacole and Edith Cavell Assembly – Key Stage One

£12.99

Mary Seacole and Edith Cavell Assembly

Description

Mary Seacole and Edith Cavell Assembly – Key Stage One

Mary Seacole and Edith Cavell Assembly – Key Stage One (KS1). Looking at the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements, comparing aspects of life in different periods. This assembly takes a look at the lives of two remarkable women – Mary Seacole and Edith Cavell – stories of outstanding courage in the face of overwhelming adversity.

Cast: 30 – easily adjustable up or down. Duration – around 15 minutes (not including music).

Also available

  • Assembly on Florence Nightingale
  • Assembly on Florence Nightingale, Mary Seacole and Edith Cavell
  • Assembly on Florence Nightingale & Edith Cavell
    This script is one of the Famous People Series based on the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements, comparing aspects of life in different periods. This list of ‘greats’ includes:
  • Queens –  Elizabeth I and Victoria (now available)
  • Explorers – Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong
  • Inventors – William Caxton and Tim Berners-Lee
  • Painters –  Pieter Bruegel the Elder and LS Lowry (now available)
  • Women:          (i) In Civil Rights – Rosa Parks and Emily Davison &

Set of Guided Reading Scripts on Amazing Women:

  1. Amazing Women From Across the World: 15th – 20th century
  2. Amazing Women From Across the World: 20th Century
  3. Amazing Women in the American Women’s Suffrage Movement
  4. Amazing Women in the American Civil Rights Movement

Including Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Ida Wells, Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer & Rosa Parks

5. Amazing First Ladies 31-35

Mary Seacole and Edith Cavell Assembly Sample Text

Narrator:             You’re right, ladies. Let’s get a bit more useful information – that isn’t just about grabbing the headlines. Let’s start with the Crimean War.

Enter Soldiers 1 – 3)

Soldier 1:             Us Brits, along with the French, were fighting

Soldier 2:             Russia and Turkey

Soldier 3:             In the Crimean War fought between 1853 and 1856.

(Exit Soldiers 1 – 3)

Child 5:                 That was during Queen Victoria’s reign

Child 6:                 Which lasted from 1837 to 1901.

Narrator:             And can someone show us where this war took place? I’m not sure many of us know where the Crimea is.

(Enter Child 7, 8 and 9, holding globe or chart of the world)

Child 7:                 (Pointing to Crimea) This is where the war took place, in the southern part of Russia.

Narrator:             Wow! That’s a long way away!

Mary:                   It certainly was! Just think how scary such a journey would have been!

Edith:                    Yes, people certainly didn’t travel then like you do today!

Child 8:                 No EasyJet or Ryan Air around in those days!

Child 9:                The journey took days, sometimes weeks, depending on the weather.

Child 7:                 No comfortable ferries in those days!

Mary:                   We risked our lives just getting there,

Child 8:                 Before you’d even got to the battlefields!

Narrator:             Exhausting! Please do all take a seat for the moment!

(Exit everyone except Narrator)

So let’s now turn our attention to the First World War.

(Enter Soldiers 4, 5 & 6)

Soldier 4:             1914 to 1918

Soldier 5:             Fought between The Central Powers

Soldier 6:             And the Allied Powers.

Soldier 4:             Germany and the Austro-Hungarian Empire

Soldier 5:             Versus France and Russia to start with,

Soldier 6:             And then lots of other countries including Britain.

Narrator:             I think we need to look at the world again!

(Exit Soldier 4, 5 & 6)

(Enter Child 8 and 9 with world globe/chart)

Child 9:                 (Pointing) So these were some of the countries involved.

Edith:                    And this (pointing to Belgium) was where I tried to free those who were stuck in enemy territory.

(Exit Child 8 & 9)

Narrator:             You mean, Belgium – as occupied by the Germans?

Edith:                    Correct.

Narrator:             (Spluttering) But, but … surely that was putting your own life at tremendous risk?

Edith:                    Well, of course. But sometimes you have to think of a bigger cause than just yourself.

Narrator:             But you …

(Enter Mary Seacole)

Edith:                    (Looking at Mary) After three. One, two, three …

Both together:   And us, mere women!!

Edith:                    (To Narrator) Isn’t that what you were going to say?

 

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