Silas Marner

£3.99

The story of Silas Marner, written by George Elliot, is re-told here through a cast of 10 plus, reading time around 15 – 20 minutes, with supplementary discussion themes and a comprehension exercise.

Description

The story of Silas Marner, written by George Elliot, is re-told here through a cast of 10 plus, reading time around 15 – 20 minutes, with supplementary discussion themes and a comprehension exercise.

Truly one of the loveliest tales of love and redemption.

Sample Text:

Godfrey:              Enough! I can’t bear to hear anymore. You killed Wildfire by sheer recklessness!

Silas:                     (Tutting) Shocking to hear, I know. But what happened next was, I think, way worse than your loss that day.

Dunsey:                OK so not my finest hour. But fancy making it so easy for me?

Silas:                     (Furiously) And how was I to know you’d be snooping outside my cottage, watching my every move?

Dunsey:                Well, it was fairly interesting to see where you hid all your gold!

Silas:                     I bet it was! But then to rob me of the lot? I will never forget returning to find it all gone.

Godfrey:              (To Dunsey) You devil!

Silas:                     I was beside myself. I even accused an innocent man.

Squire:                  (Rousing) You mean, that poacher, Jem Rodney? I’d have had him charged on the spot!

Silas:                     But that’s where we differ. I might have been angry but I didn’t lose my sense of what was fair.

Squire:                  A common poacher? Hanging was the least he deserved!

Silas:                     For something he didn’t do? I knew how that felt – to be wrongfully accused.

Squire:                  Bah! I wouldn’t waste any sympathy on poachers. Commoners! Vermin!

Silas:                     Unlike Dunsey who was happy to take all that money from you?

This script is one of a collection available from www.plays-r-ussell.com  including the works of such writers as Charles Dickens, H.G. Welles, Robert Lewis Stephenson, Oscar Wilde, Jane Austen and Emily Bronte

 

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